MINING EQUIPMENT MARKET : MINING EQUIPMENT


Mining equipment market : Equipment rental alabama : Industrial bakery equipment.



Mining Equipment Market





mining equipment market






    mining equipment
  • Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an ore body, vein or (coal) seam. Materials recovered by mining include base metals, precious metals, iron, uranium, coal, diamonds, limestone, oil shale, rock salt and potash.





    market
  • A regular gathering of people for the purchase and sale of provisions, livestock, and other commodities

  • An area or arena in which commercial dealings are conducted

  • engage in the commercial promotion, sale, or distribution of; "The company is marketing its new line of beauty products"

  • the customers for a particular product or service; "before they publish any book they try to determine the size of the market for it"

  • An open space or covered building where vendors convene to sell their goods

  • the world of commercial activity where goods and services are bought and sold; "without competition there would be no market"; "they were driven from the marketplace"











mining equipment market - The 2011




The 2011 Report on Parts Sold Separately for Power Cranes, Draglines, Shovels, Excavators, and Surface Mining Equipment: World Market Segmentation by City


The 2011 Report on Parts Sold Separately for Power Cranes, Draglines, Shovels, Excavators, and Surface Mining Equipment: World Market Segmentation by City



This report was created for global strategic planners who cannot be content with traditional methods of segmenting world markets. With the advent of a "borderless world", cities become a more important criteria in prioritizing markets, as opposed to regions, continents, or countries. This report covers the top 2000 cities in over 200 countries. It does so by reporting the estimated market size (in terms of latent demand) for each major city of the world. It then ranks these cities and reports them in terms of their size as a percent of the country where they are located, their geographic region (e.g. Africa, Asia, Europe, Middle East, North America, Latin America), and the total world market.

In performing various economic analyses for its clients, I have been occasionally asked to investigate the market potential for various products and services across cities. The purpose of the studies is to understand the density of demand within a country and the extent to which a city might be used as a point of distribution within its region. From an economic perspective, however, a city does not represent a population within rigid geographical boundaries. To an economist or strategic planner, a city represents an area of dominant influence over markets in adjacent areas. This influence varies from one industry to another, but also from one period of time to another.

In what follows, I summarize the economic potential for the world's major cities for "parts sold separately for power cranes, draglines, shovels, excavators, and surface mining equipment" for the year 2011. The goal of this report is to report my findings on the real economic potential, or what an economist calls the latent demand, represented by a city when defined as an area of dominant influence. The reader needs to realize that latent demand may or may not represent real sales.










86% (17)





Sloss Furnaces, Blower Room




Sloss Furnaces, Blower Room





From wwwlslossfurnaces.com:

In the years following the Civil War, railroad men, land developers and speculators moved into Jones Valley to take advantage of the area’s rich mineral resources. All the ingredients needed to make iron lay within a thirty-mile radius. Seams of iron ore stretched for 25 miles through Red Mountain, the southeastern boundary of Jones Valley. To the north and west were abundant deposits of coal, while limestone, dolomite, and clay underlay the valley itself. In 1871 southern entrepreneurs founded a new city called Birmingham and began the systematic exploitation of its minerals.

train.jpgOne of these men was Colonel James Withers Sloss, a north Alabama merchant and railroad man. Colonel Sloss played an important role in the founding of the city by convincing the L&N Railroad to capitalize completion of the South and North rail line through Jones Valley, the site of the new town. In 1880, having helped form the Pratt Coke and Coal Company, which mined and sold Birmingham’s first high-grade coking coal, he founded the Sloss Furnace Company, and two years later “blew-in” the second blast furnace in Birmingham.

Construction of Sloss’s new furnace (City Furnaces) began in June 1881, when ground was broken on a fifty-acre site that had been donated by the Elyton Land Company. Harry Hargreaves, a European-born engineer, was in charge of construction. Hargreaves had been a pupil of Thomas Whitwell, a British inventor who designed the stoves that would supply the hot-air blast for the new furnaces. Sixty feet high and eighteen feet in diameter, Sloss’s new Whitwell stoves were the first of their type ever built in Birmingham and were comparable to similar equipment used in the North. Local observers were proud that much of the machinery used by Sloss’s new furnaces would be of Southern manufacture. It included two blowing engines and ten boilers, thirty feet long and forty-six inches in diameter. In April 1882, the furnaces went into blast. After its first year of operations, the furnace had sold 24,000 tons of iron. At the 1883 Louisville Exposition, the company won a bronze medal for ‘best pig iron.’

During the 1880s, as pig iron production in Alabama grew from 68,995 to 706,629 gross tons, no fewer than nineteen blast furnaces would be built in Jefferson County alone. Per Dr. W. David Lewis, author of Sloss Furnaces and the Rise of the Birmingham District, Sloss Furnaces was born at a time when the “doldrums of the postwar era had ended and the South was feeling a measure of confidence for the first time since the opening years of the Civil War.”

Town planners, railroad magnates, and industrialists such as, Sloss received, as one Alabama newspaper stated, “a degree of adulation previously reserved for military heroes.” In November 1881, the Birmingham press promoted Sloss as a candidate for governor. “His excellent business qualifications, brilliant intellect, splendid character, and fine executive ability, all combined, make him the grandest man in Alabama today for our chief executive. He is the very personification of Christian manhood and integrity, possessing the qualifications of head and heart which we should emulate.” Inspired by such rhetoric, Alabama, not surprisingly, eagerly embraced what was being called the "gospel of industrialism."

James W. Sloss retired in 1886 and sold the company to a group of financiers who guided it through a period of rapid expansion. The company reorganized in 1899 as Sloss-Sheffield Steel and Iron, although it was never to make steel. With the acquisition of additional furnaces and extensive mineral lands in northern Alabama, Sloss-Sheffield became the second largest merchant pig-iron company in the Birmingham district. Company assets included seven blast furnaces, 1500 beehive coke ovens, 120,000 acres of coal and ore land, five Jefferson County coal mines and two red ore mines, brown ore mines, and quarries in North Birmingham. By World War I, Sloss-Sheffield was among the largest producers of pig iron in the world.

In the late 1930s World War II expanded the market for iron and steel and created jobs for Birmingham workers. By 1941 when America entered the war, nearly half the labor force was employed by the iron and steel and mining industries; more than two-thirds of the industries’ workers were African-American.

Despite being dominated by black labor, the industrial workplace was rigidly segregated until the 1960s. Workers at Sloss bathed in separate bath houses, punched separate time clocks, attended separate company picnics. More important was the segregation of jobs.

The company operated as a hierarchy. At the top there was an all white group of managers, chemists, accountants, and engineers; at the bottom an all black “labor gang” assisted, (until its demise in 1928, by the use of convict labor). Sloss utitlized the convict leasing system only in its coal mines. As Lewis noted in Sloss Furnaces, “....convict labor











Stick of dynamite - Potosi Miner's Market, Bolivia




Stick of dynamite - Potosi Miner's Market, Bolivia





Anyone can buy this from the miners market, even kids - kids work in
mines - 18 bolivianos ($AUD 4) gets you a stick, detonator and fuse.
No id, no fuss.
We started off here (after changing into protective gear) on a tour of
the mines in Potosi, Bolivia. We bought several sticks, soft drinks
and coca leaves as gifts for the miners, before heading to the mine.
First we saw refinement of the material using primitive equipment,
including small scoops that spun around tossing substances like
arsenic around. We then descended into the mine itself, with our tour
disclaimer firmly in mind, stating that this is not a tourist mine,
but a fully functioning one, and that we accept all risks, explicitly
the risk of cave-ins, which is the number one cause of death of miners.
The mines are extremely dusty, so we tied handkerchiefs around our
faces as a primitive filter, but most of us were coughing pretty soon
after entering. The life expectancy of the miners is 40 years old,
with many developing lung and other health problems.
Moving through the mine was tough -
Potosi itself is at over 4000 metres, but the mine was at 4700. The
altitude, poor ventilation, thick dust and breathing through a
handkerchief made crawling through tunnels and sliding down shafts a
challenge. At times, dirt and stones would tumble from above and you'd
wonder if it were the start of a cave-in, especially when piles of
rock were held in place with chunks of wood above your path. Climbing
(sliding) to lower levels you couldn't be sure what could be safe to
use as support.
We descended four levels, sometimes walking through sections of yellow
puddles (there are no toilets, and the miners work 10+ hours without
resurfacing), and passing miners at work. All if them were chewing
coca, evident by the massive ball in their cheeks - coca and soft
drink are their only sustenance while working. As a group we all
chewed it also, as it helps deal with the harsh conditions - it was
stinking hot, and that was without shovelling rock and pushing 2 tonne
carts around. We spoke with one of the miners who had worked for
almost 30 years, (they usually start as kids) and he looked emaciated
and about 20 years older than his real age.
After our ascent to the surface, we blew up 2 sticks of dynamite (our
guide - himself a miner, set them up), that we had bought earlier.
Some of us (intelligently) took photos holding it with a lit fuse,
prior to one of the miner guys running off with it to dump a safe
distance before detonation.
There's no way you'd get away with half of this in a developed country.









mining equipment market








mining equipment market




The 2009 Report on Manufacturing Mineral Beneficiating Machinery and Equipment Used in Surface or Underground Mines, Underground Mining Machinery and Equipment, ... Drills: World Market Segmentation by City






This report was created for global strategic planners who cannot be content with traditional methods of segmenting world markets. With the advent of a "borderless world", cities become a more important criteria in prioritizing markets, as opposed to regions, continents, or countries. This report covers the top 2000 cities in over 200 countries. It does so by reporting the estimated market size (in terms of latent demand) for each major city of the world. It then ranks these cities and reports them in terms of their size as a percent of the country where they are located, their geographic region (e.g. Africa, Asia, Europe, Middle East, North America, Latin America), and the total world market.

In performing various economic analyses for its clients, I have been occasionally asked to investigate the market potential for various products and services across cities. The purpose of the studies is to understand the density of demand within a country and the extent to which a city might be used as a point of distribution within its region. From an economic perspective, however, a city does not represent a population within rigid geographical boundaries. To an economist or strategic planner, a city represents an area of dominant influence over markets in adjacent areas. This influence varies from one industry to another, but also from one period of time to another.

In what follows, I summarize the economic potential for the world's major cities for "manufacturing mineral beneficiating machinery and equipment used in surface or underground mines, underground mining machinery and equipment, coal breakers, mining cars, core drills, coal cutters, and rock drills" for the year 2009. The goal of this report is to report my findings on the real economic potential, or what an economist calls the latent demand, represented by a city when defined as an area of dominant influence. The reader needs to realize that latent demand may or may not represent real sales.










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